The Long Now

The Long Now Foundation unveiled its Orrery clock last night to the public in Marin County, California.

The Orrery is a ten foot tall planet tracking display. The lower half is a mechanical binary calculation engine. Each layer is calculating the orbit if one of the six human eye visible planets (Mercury through Saturn) to 28 bits of accuracy. The Orrery is primarily made of monel (a nickel copper alloy), and stainless steel. The planet spheres are ground from natural stones that resemble each planet they represent.

longnow.org

The Orrery is based off the same mechanical calculation engine (above/below) that powers the 10,000 year clock, the original prototype of The Long Now Foundation.

The 10,000 year clock is a “monument scale, multi-millennial, all mechanical clock [built] as an icon to long term thinking”. It ticks once a year, its hand counts the centuries, and it chimes every millennium.

The Long Now

The Long Now Foundation unveiled its Orrery clock last night to the public in Marin County, California.

The Orrery is a ten foot tall planet tracking display. The lower half is a mechanical binary calculation engine. Each layer is calculating the orbit if one of the six human eye visible planets (Mercury through Saturn) to 28 bits of accuracy. The Orrery is primarily made of monel (a nickel copper alloy), and stainless steel. The planet spheres are ground from natural stones that resemble each planet they represent.

longnow.org

The Orrery is based off the same mechanical calculation engine (above/below) that powers the 10,000 year clock, the original prototype of The Long Now Foundation.

The 10,000 year clock is a “monument scale, multi-millennial, all mechanical clock [built] as an icon to long term thinking”. It ticks once a year, its hand counts the centuries, and it chimes every millennium.

Entermation

The Colbert Report premiered Monday (weekdays @ 11:30pm, following The Daily Show on Comedy Central), and if you haven’t yet caught it (fools), here are the first week’s episodes available for download, courtesy CommonBits:

Those are torrent files, BTW – so if you can’t use them, here’s the first episode for direct download:

Entermation

The Colbert Report premiered Monday (weekdays @ 11:30pm, following The Daily Show on Comedy Central), and if you haven’t yet caught it (fools), here are the first week’s episodes available for download, courtesy CommonBits:

Those are torrent files, BTW — so if you can’t use them, here’s the first episode for direct download:

Imogen Heap

I was just thinking of writing about Imogen Heap, when Paul Irish posted his recent interview with her over at aurgasm. I found his site a couple months ago when I was putting together a college radio show proposal. The demo I had just compiled had her (excellent) track, “Hide And Seek”, and after playing the song for my roommate, we were thinking of possible names that played off ‘aural’ (my first idea was ’aural fixation’, but that’s already been done). He suggested ‘aurgasm’, and a Google search later I had found an excellent source for new music. Now, that search has come full circle … or something … it’s a damn small world regardless.

Narcissism aside, Imogen is best known as the voice of Frou Frou, specifically her single “Let Go”, featured in the movie Garden State last year. Her newest solo album, Speak For Yourself, just came out in the UK, and is set for US release the first of November (that’s Imogen above, having just purchased a copy for herself). It’s already the 277th most popular album on Amazon (US) with more than ten days left until its arrival.

She also has both a blog and a Flickr account, which she updates semi-frequently. She found the photographer for her album’s liner notes on Flickr by searching for photos tagged with ‘London’.

I’ll leave the rest to Paul, as he has a lot more information, a number of her songs available for download, and some of her music recommendations as well – although you can download “Hide And Seek” here if you like.

Imogen Heap

I was just thinking of writing about Imogen Heap, when Paul Irish posted his recent interview with her over at aurgasm. I found his site a couple months ago when I was putting together a college radio show proposal. The demo I had just compiled had her (excellent) track, “Hide And Seek”, and after playing the song for my roommate, we were thinking of possible names that played off ‘aural’ (my first idea was ‘aural fixation‘, but that’s already been done). He suggested ‘aurgasm’, and a Google search later I had found an excellent source for new music. Now, that search has come full circle … or something … it’s a damn small world regardless.

Narcissism aside, Imogen is best known as the voice of Frou Frou, specifically her single “Let Go”, featured in the movie Garden State last year. Her newest solo album, Speak For Yourself, just came out in the UK, and is set for US release the first of November (that’s Imogen above, having just purchased a copy for herself). It’s already the 277th most popular album on Amazon (US) with more than ten days left until its arrival.

She also has both a blog and a Flickr account, which she updates semi-frequently. She found the photographer for her album’s liner notes on Flickr by searching for photos tagged with ‘London’.

I’ll leave the rest to Paul, as he has a lot more information, a number of her songs available for download, and some of her music recommendations as well — although you can download “Hide And Seek” here if you like.

Hurricane Roll Call

A time-lapse animation of this year’s hurricane season thus far, with all the storms from A-Z (except Vince (near Portugal/Spain, and thus not in the field of view)).

Hurricane Roll Call

A time-lapse animation of this year’s hurricane season thus far, with all the storms from A-Z (except Vince (near Portugal/Spain, and thus not in the field of view)).

American Tribes

a collaboratively generated geographical map of the US that visualizes how the country is organized culturally, as opposed to its traditional political boundaries. the map attempts to show how the country is divided into ‘spheres of influence’ between different cities at the national, regional & local levels.

information aesthetics

You can place a few votes with CommonCensus regarding what city has the most economic/cultural/etc influence on you and where you live, and contribute to the composition of the map. They’re saying its a little rougher than they’d like right now, so more votes = more resolution. Removing the context of state lines and city limits provides a more accurate representation of how we view our country and identify with other people. I’ve always thought the goal of visiting all 50 states was a little overrated, but visiting all these tribes would make a lot more sense, and be a more significant accomplishment to boot.

Update: CommonCensus has been getting some good attention lately, and they’ve updated the map to reflect all the new votes – now around 16,000. You can still view the 8,000 and 4,000 vote maps on their website, as well as another project they’re working on that applies the same idea to sports. The next update will be published at 32,000 votes, and so on – the resolution and accuracy improves as they obtain more data. Contributing takes only 12 clicks.

American Tribes

a collaboratively generated geographical map of the US that visualizes how the country is organized culturally, as opposed to its traditional political boundaries. the map attempts to show how the country is divided into ‘spheres of influence’ between different cities at the national, regional & local levels.

information aesthetics

You can place a few votes with CommonCensus regarding what city has the most economic/cultural/etc influence on you and where you live, and contribute to the composition of the map. They’re saying its a little rougher than they’d like right now, so more votes = more resolution. Removing the context of state lines and city limits provides a more accurate representation of how we view our country and identify with other people. I’ve always thought the goal of visiting all 50 states was a little overrated, but visiting all these tribes would make a lot more sense, and be a more significant accomplishment to boot.

Update: CommonCensus has been getting some good attention lately, and they’ve updated the map to reflect all the new votes — now around 16,000. You can still view the 8,000 and 4,000 vote maps on their website, as well as another project they’re working on that applies the same idea to sports. The next update will be published at 32,000 votes, and so on — the resolution and accuracy improves as they obtain more data. Contributing takes only 12 clicks.