Save The Bracewell Observatory!

Five 60-foot radio antennas at Stanford, named after Professor Ronald Bracewell, a pioneer of radio astronomy, are about to be demolished. Dr. Bracewell created the observatory to monitor sunspot activity and measure the movement of our solar system.

A team of volunteers have organized offering to maintain the facility, and have gotten support from NASA and JPL for inclusion of the site in their Deep Space Network with “little or no cost” to Stanford. The antennas could be used by the university and the public alike, including remote access from the internet.

You can volunteer to help, donate to the cause, and/or sign the petition to stop the demolition. For more information, contact Bob Lash at bob@bambi.net.

Save The Bracewell Observatory!

Five 60-foot radio antennas at Stanford, named after Professor Ronald Bracewell, a pioneer of radio astronomy, are about to be demolished. Dr. Bracewell created the observatory to monitor sunspot activity and measure the movement of our solar system.

A team of volunteers have organized offering to maintain the facility, and have gotten support from NASA and JPL for inclusion of the site in their Deep Space Network with “little or no cost” to Stanford. The antennas could be used by the university and the public alike, including remote access from the internet.

You can volunteer to help, donate to the cause, and/or sign the petition to stop the demolition. For more information, contact Bob Lash at bob@bambi.net.

Bottled Water Not Healthier, 10,000x More Expensive

image credit: Stephen Edwards

A new report warns that people’s thirst for bottled water is producing unnecessary garbage and consuming vast quantities of energy, even in areas where perfectly good drinking water is available on tap.

The report, released earlier this month by the Earth Policy Institute (EPI), says global consumption of bottled water doubled between 1999 and 2004, reaching 41 billion gallons (154 billion liters) annually.

Bottled water is often no healthier than tap water, but it can be 10,000 times more expensive, says Emily Arnold, a researcher with the Washington D.C.-based nonprofit.

Not necessarily healthier is the key, as bottled water has its uses. The point is that for many people, there are better solutions.

Bottled Water Not Healthier, 10,000x More Expensive

image credit: Stephen Edwards

A new report warns that people’s thirst for bottled water is producing unnecessary garbage and consuming vast quantities of energy, even in areas where perfectly good drinking water is available on tap.

The report, released earlier this month by the Earth Policy Institute (EPI), says global consumption of bottled water doubled between 1999 and 2004, reaching 41 billion gallons (154 billion liters) annually.

Bottled water is often no healthier than tap water, but it can be 10,000 times more expensive, says Emily Arnold, a researcher with the Washington D.C.-based nonprofit.

Not necessarily healthier is the key, as bottled water has its uses. The point is that for many people, there are better solutions.