The End of Radio, TV and Print

Here’s an interesting look at the state of digital and traditional media from CBC and pop culture guru Jian Ghomeshi: The End. There are three segments, one for radio, TV and print, each 22 minutes long.

So far I’ve only watched The End of Print, and while it’s nothing you haven’t already heard if you follow this kind of thing, it does a good job of melding a lot of the key ideas together. Familiar faces include BoingBoing’s Cory Doctorow and David Pescovitz, Craigslist’s Craig Newmark, Wikipedia’s Jimmy Wales, and Dooce’s Heather Armstrong – all interviewed at SXSWi (is that Dave Seah for a split second near the beginning?) – as well as representatives from the New York Times and author Margaret Atwood.

Nearly everyone interviewed from the print industry seems excessively put off at the topic of emerging digital media. Maybe it’s just some good editing and the general spin of the series, but their fear of the unknown is palpable. This isn’t war silly humans, just change and growth. Darwin and all that.

The End of Radio, TV and Print

Here’s an interesting look at the state of digital and traditional media from CBC and pop culture guru Jian Ghomeshi: The End. There are three segments, one for radio, TV and print, each 22 minutes long.

So far I’ve only watched The End of Print, and while it’s nothing you haven’t already heard if you follow this kind of thing, it does a good job of melding a lot of the key ideas together. Familiar faces include BoingBoing‘s Cory Doctorow and David Pescovitz, Craigslist‘s Craig Newmark, Wikipedia‘s Jimmy Wales, and Dooce‘s Heather Armstrong — all interviewed at SXSWi (is that Dave Seah for a split second near the beginning?) — as well as representatives from the New York Times and author Margaret Atwood.

Nearly everyone interviewed from the print industry seems excessively put off at the topic of emerging digital media. Maybe it’s just some good editing and the general spin of the series, but their fear of the unknown is palpable. This isn’t war silly humans, just change and growth. Darwin and all that.

Edison Gem

Sharing their name w/ the first mass-produced gramophone, Orion and Jadis, North Carolina natives, merge celestial vocals and tripping rhythms to create beautiful downtempo and DnB melodies.

The end of one thing is often the beginning of another. Edison Gem are proof positive that destruction can double as a form of creation. The production team, a collaborative effort between Orion and Jadis, has focused the energy borne of the failure of their relationship into an inspired mélange of expression, class, and dancefloor sensibility.

They’ve got an album coming in a couple months, but for now there are two tracks available on iTunes as well as some music on their MySpace page. My favorite tune is “Things Change”, which I’ve added to the podcast via a clip hijacked from yesterday’s XOdusShow on bassdrive.com.

Edison Gem

Sharing their name w/ the first mass-produced gramophone, Orion and Jadis, North Carolina natives, merge celestial vocals and tripping rhythms to create beautiful downtempo and DnB melodies.

The end of one thing is often the beginning of another. Edison Gem are proof positive that destruction can double as a form of creation. The production team, a collaborative effort between Orion and Jadis, has focused the energy borne of the failure of their relationship into an inspired mélange of expression, class, and dancefloor sensibility.

They’ve got an album coming in a couple months, but for now there are two tracks available on iTunes as well as some music on their MySpace page. My favorite tune is “Things Change”, which I’ve added to the podcast via a clip hijacked from yesterday’s XOdusShow on bassdrive.com.

Whitney Music Box

each of the 48 dots moves in a circle on a 3 minute cycle. at the end of 3 minutes, the outermost dot will have moved around the circle once (this dot represents the 1st harmonic or fundamental). the next dot will have moved around the circle twice (representing the 2nd harmonic), & so on. each dot triggers a note when it passes the zero degree line, so that the pattern causes chords, ascending & descending runs & melodies to be heard.

infosthetics

The idea comes from the motion graphics John Whitney described in his book, Digital Harmony. Is it too far-fetched to imagine something like this paired with some Bach or Mozart? It could be more of a modal visualization (a la The Shape of Song), but would be all varieties of awesome.

Update: Yeah, maybe a little far-fetched.

Whitney Music Box

each of the 48 dots moves in a circle on a 3 minute cycle. at the end of 3 minutes, the outermost dot will have moved around the circle once (this dot represents the 1st harmonic or fundamental). the next dot will have moved around the circle twice (representing the 2nd harmonic), & so on. each dot triggers a note when it passes the zero degree line, so that the pattern causes chords, ascending & descending runs & melodies to be heard.

infosthetics

The idea comes from the motion graphics John Whitney described in his book, Digital Harmony. Is it too far-fetched to imagine something like this paired with some Bach or Mozart? It could be more of a modal visualization (a la The Shape of Song), but would be all varieties of awesome.

Update: Yeah, maybe a little far-fetched.