Rich Man’s Frug: The Aloof (Contest Winner!)

The above video wins the contest, if not simply because I would never find something like this myself: some wicked hot dancing from the 1969 musical Sweet Charity, directed and choreographed by Bob Fosse. The featured scene is the first “movement” to a three-part dance number called “The Rich Man’s Frug”.

The Frug (“froog”) is a popular dance from the 60’s that evolved from The Chicken, which itself was mostly used in combination with The Twist.

This was submitted by Andrew Eglinton, a playwright pursuing an MA in writing for performance at Goldsmiths College at the University of London. He blogs about theater and writing at Desperate Curiosity, a recent addition to the 9rules network. Andrew also sent me two more links, both of which I’ve already seen but are no less excellent. Check out his website and other submissions:

Why Religion Must End

world religious distribution (view full size)

An interview with Sam Harris, author of The End of Faith, in which he argues religion in the modern world does more harm than good.

(…) this whole style of believing and talking about beliefs leaves us powerless to overcome our differences from one another. We have Christians against Muslims against Jews, and no matter how liberal your theology, merely identifying yourself as a Christian or a Jew lends tacit validity to this status quo. People have morally identified with a subset of humanity rather than with humanity as a whole. (…)

I think atheism and secularism are (…) names that ultimately we don’t need. We don’t need a name for disbelief in astrology. I don’t think we need anything other than rationality and reason and intellectual honesty. (…)

There’s no doubt that praying to Jesus for 18 hours a day will transform your psychology – and in many ways, transform it for the better. I just think that we don’t have to believe anything preposterous in order to understand that. [We can] value the example of Jesus, (…) and we should want to discover if there’s a way to love your neighbor as yourself and generate the kind of moral psychology that Jesus was talking about. (…)

Either you can be held hostage by the human conversation that occurred 2,000 years ago and has been enshrined in these books, or you can be open to the human conversation of the 21st century.

Previously on CN:

Rich Man’s Frug: The Aloof (Contest Winner!)

The above video wins the contest, if not simply because I would never find something like this myself: some wicked hot dancing from the 1969 musical Sweet Charity, directed and choreographed by Bob Fosse. The featured scene is the first “movement” to a three-part dance number called “The Rich Man’s Frug”.

The Frug (“froog“) is a popular dance from the 60’s that evolved from The Chicken, which itself was mostly used in combination with The Twist.

This was submitted by Andrew Eglinton, a playwright pursuing an MA in writing for performance at Goldsmiths College at the University of London. He blogs about theater and writing at Desperate Curiosity, a recent addition to the 9rules network. Andrew also sent me two more links, both of which I’ve already seen but are no less excellent. Check out his website and other submissions:

Why Religion Must End

world religious distribution (view full size)

An interview with Sam Harris, author of The End of Faith, in which he argues religion in the modern world does more harm than good.

(…) this whole style of believing and talking about beliefs leaves us powerless to overcome our differences from one another. We have Christians against Muslims against Jews, and no matter how liberal your theology, merely identifying yourself as a Christian or a Jew lends tacit validity to this status quo. People have morally identified with a subset of humanity rather than with humanity as a whole. (…)

I think atheism and secularism are (…) names that ultimately we don’t need. We don’t need a name for disbelief in astrology. I don’t think we need anything other than rationality and reason and intellectual honesty. (…)

There’s no doubt that praying to Jesus for 18 hours a day will transform your psychology — and in many ways, transform it for the better. I just think that we don’t have to believe anything preposterous in order to understand that. [We can] value the example of Jesus, (…) and we should want to discover if there’s a way to love your neighbor as yourself and generate the kind of moral psychology that Jesus was talking about. (…)

Either you can be held hostage by the human conversation that occurred 2,000 years ago and has been enshrined in these books, or you can be open to the human conversation of the 21st century.

Previously on CN:

High-Rise China

Skidmore, Owings & Merril (SOM), the architectural firm behind Chicago’s Sears Tower and New York’s Lever House, currently have over 50 active projects in China, of which more than 15 are skyscrapers.

Previously on CN:

High-Rise China

Skidmore, Owings & Merril (SOM), the architectural firm behind Chicago’s Sears Tower and New York’s Lever House, currently have over 50 active projects in China, of which more than 15 are skyscrapers.

Previously on CN:

Corinne Bailey Rae

I first heard Corinne on aurgasm a few months ago, and just saw via Giant Step that her new self-titled album was released yesterday (although iTunes shows it coming out back in March?). Some reviews and remarks on her talent include:

Perfectly understated and effortlessly enjoyable (…)

OK

Her voice (…) when fully unleashed, filled the room like a whisky-scented genie.

The Observer / Guardian

I especially enjoy “Like a Star”, “Enchantment”, “Put Your Records On”, “Call Me When You Get This” and “Another Rainy Day” from the album. iTunes has an acoustic version of “Put Your Records On” as well that’s really good. Apparently she was on KCRW’s Morning Becomes Eclectic a ways back and gave a killer performance – unfortunately I can’t find any aural evidence of this. If anyone else has/does, hit me up.

Here’s a couple tracks from the album, for your summer-evening listening pleasure: