Solstice to Solstice



Jim Bumgardner, coauthor of the book Flickr Hacks and self-described “absent-minded geek with music skills & an obsession with radial symmetry” has made all kinds of generative art with Flickr, some of which can be purchased as posters.

His latest takes 40,000 photos tagged “sunset” last year, each positioned horizontally according to the day taken, and vertically according to the hour. You can watch the year progress as the summer and winter solstices fade back and forth. Grab the full res version or you’re only kidding yourself.

Previously: Summer Solstice

Innerspace Dolphin

Top speed: 35 mph above water, 20 mph below. Submerses a few feet (but can dive up to 10 ft. briefly) and using its positive buoyancy can jump and barrel roll on the surface.

On Closer Inspection

xRez takes extremely high-resolution photography of land- and cityscapes. They’ve also integrated some of their work with the Google Maps API to allow for easy browsing and zooming. I’ve seen other gigapixel photography online but this is the first time its actually been usable inside a web page.

MapLib lets you use your own photography with the Google Maps interface.

On Closer Inspection

xRez takes extremely high-resolution photography of land- and cityscapes. They’ve also integrated some of their work with the Google Maps API to allow for easy browsing and zooming. I’ve seen other gigapixel photography online but this is the first time its actually been usable inside a web page.

MapLib lets you use your own photography with the Google Maps interface.

And a Reckoning is Coming, That’s All I’m Saying

“DNA” by Sven Geier

From “Silly Things My 3-Year-Old Said That I’m Certain the Rest of the World Would Find Sweet and Cute” by Dan Kennedy:

Before the Babysitter Arrived

ME: Will you be good for Colleen? Do you know Daddy doesn’t want to go away for a week, but he has to?

HIM: I’ve been in your cells. I have literally seen that you are made of billions of tiny pieces of “Don’t want to” and billions of tiny pieces of “But I have to.” Every piece of you is in struggle instead of motion. Every atom in this room knows that it must move and it doesn’t resist or struggle with that part of its nature. It doesn’t argue with its urge to be in motion, and because of this, things like that coffee table remain solid. If the atoms in that table stopped moving, that table would cease to be matter, this we know. Well, it’s like that with people, too, really. You see, inside all of us is a cellular and genetic code centuries old, designed to keep us in constant motion on a cellular level, some cells living, some cells dying, all part of the wiring designed to keep you living, to keep you moving, to keep you growing. But Daddy has to fight it, doesn’t he? Daddy has to think about it, and analyze it, doesn’t he? So, inside of Daddy the cells receive their usual neurological directives, and then they listen to the hemming and hawing and wondering. The “I don’t want to, but I have to” song and dance. The “Someday maybe, oh never mind, forget it” dance. The cells lurch to and fro, unsure of what they’re being told. And for this, sir, you are literally the cause of your own cowardice. You are literally trying to make what is you disappear, cease to be matter. In that regard, you are biologically your own worst enemy, and I am your day of reckoning, the person who makes you stop fighting yourself. The person who makes you finally understand how to give in to your nature and enjoy the reward and abundance of that.

ME: Do you want a silly juicy? Are you thirsty? Thirsty juicy?

HIM: Will you ever see it? You are literally made of a billion tiny conflicts and it’s killing you.

And a Reckoning is Coming, That’s All I’m Saying

“DNA” by Sven Geier

From “Silly Things My 3-Year-Old Said That I’m Certain the Rest of the World Would Find Sweet and Cute” by Dan Kennedy:

Before the Babysitter Arrived

ME: Will you be good for Colleen? Do you know Daddy doesn’t want to go away for a week, but he has to?

HIM: I’ve been in your cells. I have literally seen that you are made of billions of tiny pieces of “Don’t want to” and billions of tiny pieces of “But I have to.” Every piece of you is in struggle instead of motion. Every atom in this room knows that it must move and it doesn’t resist or struggle with that part of its nature. It doesn’t argue with its urge to be in motion, and because of this, things like that coffee table remain solid. If the atoms in that table stopped moving, that table would cease to be matter, this we know. Well, it’s like that with people, too, really. You see, inside all of us is a cellular and genetic code centuries old, designed to keep us in constant motion on a cellular level, some cells living, some cells dying, all part of the wiring designed to keep you living, to keep you moving, to keep you growing. But Daddy has to fight it, doesn’t he? Daddy has to think about it, and analyze it, doesn’t he? So, inside of Daddy the cells receive their usual neurological directives, and then they listen to the hemming and hawing and wondering. The “I don’t want to, but I have to” song and dance. The “Someday maybe, oh never mind, forget it” dance. The cells lurch to and fro, unsure of what they’re being told. And for this, sir, you are literally the cause of your own cowardice. You are literally trying to make what is you disappear, cease to be matter. In that regard, you are biologically your own worst enemy, and I am your day of reckoning, the person who makes you stop fighting yourself. The person who makes you finally understand how to give in to your nature and enjoy the reward and abundance of that.

ME: Do you want a silly juicy? Are you thirsty? Thirsty juicy?

HIM: Will you ever see it? You are literally made of a billion tiny conflicts and it’s killing you.