Cut Spotlight

If you’re like me – that is, for the purpose of this post, you use a Mac and either Gmail or Google Apps for email – you’ll be happy to learn (or are already happy to know) about today’s launch of Google Desktop for OS X. One search box to rule them all: applications, files, emails, browsing history, internet search, etc.

If you’re even more like me and find Spotlight to be slow (and you aren’t a diehard Quicksilver user), you’ll probably dig this. So why not just do away with Spotlight altogether? OK:

  1. go to /System/Library/CoreServices
  2. copy Search.bundle to some place like your Documents folder for backup, then delete the original
  3. open Activity Montor and force quit SystemUIServer

When SystemUIServer relaunches you’ll be free at last. Spotlight will still index your files for use with the Finder et al, but the menu bar item will be gone. Now you can use trusty old Cmd + Space for Google Desktop instead of the default Cmd + Cmd. Stop reading my email and enjoy.

Cut Spotlight

If you’re like me — that is, for the purpose of this post, you use a Mac and either Gmail or Google Apps for email — you’ll be happy to learn (or are already happy to know) about today’s launch of Google Desktop for OS X. One search box to rule them all: applications, files, emails, browsing history, internet search, etc.

If you’re even more like me and find Spotlight to be slow (and you aren’t a diehard Quicksilver user), you’ll probably dig this. So why not just do away with Spotlight altogether? OK:

  1. go to /System/Library/CoreServices
  2. copy Search.bundle to some place like your Documents folder for backup, then delete the original
  3. open Activity Montor and force quit SystemUIServer

When SystemUIServer relaunches you’ll be free at last. Spotlight will still index your files for use with the Finder et al, but the menu bar item will be gone. Now you can use trusty old Cmd + Space for Google Desktop instead of the default Cmd + Cmd. Stop reading my email and enjoy.

Ask Jimmy Wales

image: Jimmy Wales’s brain

Waxxi, an up-and-coming “presenter and producer of live and archived interactive podcasts” is hosting a Q&A session with Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia, this Thursday at 1:30 PM et. Participation is through registration only. I don’t know if there are any more “seats” available but it’s worth a shot if you’re interested. I’ll be there and I’m trying to think of something(s) good to ask the man behind the meta, the father (I almost typed farter) of the modern encyclopedia. If anyone has any brilliant ideas let me know.

Ask Jimmy Wales

image: Jimmy Wales’s brain

Waxxi, an up-and-coming “presenter and producer of live and archived interactive podcasts” is hosting a Q&A session with Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia, this Thursday at 1:30 PM et. Participation is through registration only. I don’t know if there are any more “seats” available but it’s worth a shot if you’re interested. I’ll be there and I’m trying to think of something(s) good to ask the man behind the meta, the father (I almost typed farter) of the modern encyclopedia. If anyone has any brilliant ideas let me know.

Universcale

an interactive & quite extensive size comparison of the perception of our universe, starting from a proton (1 femtometer) over to a hydrogen atom (100 picometers), a protein nanometer (10 nanometer), & a red blood cell (7-8 micrometer), to the moon (3,764km), a nebula (30 light years), & the outer limits of our universe (13,7 billion light years).

Universcale

an interactive & quite extensive size comparison of the perception of our universe, starting from a proton (1 femtometer) over to a hydrogen atom (100 picometers), a protein nanometer (10 nanometer), & a red blood cell (7-8 micrometer), to the moon (3,764km), a nebula (30 light years), & the outer limits of our universe (13,7 billion light years).