MyPunchbowl Schedules Your Parties

MyPunchbowl.com lets you set a range of dates you’d like to throw a party, invite a bunch of friends through email, decide which friends you most want to come, and based on everyone’s responses and the dates they’re available, automaticaly decide the optimal time to get down.

MyPunchbowl Schedules Your Parties

MyPunchbowl.com lets you set a range of dates you’d like to throw a party, invite a bunch of friends through email, decide which friends you most want to come, and based on everyone’s responses and the dates they’re available, automaticaly decide the optimal time to get down.

Palau, Micronesia: Jellyfish Lake

The lake, once connected to the ocean through a tunnel, has long since been shut off by limestone. The jellyfish, with no natural predators save sea anemone which pose no serious threat, are trapped inside the lake and have grown to incredible numbers. They follow the sun and feed on algae harvested inside their bodies, and due to the safety of the lake have lost their sting.

Palau, Micronesia: Jellyfish Lake

The lake, once connected to the ocean through a tunnel, has long since been shut off by limestone. The jellyfish, with no natural predators save sea anemone which pose no serious threat, are trapped inside the lake and have grown to incredible numbers. They follow the sun and feed on algae harvested inside their bodies, and due to the safety of the lake have lost their sting.

Pond Scum Can Convert CO2 into Ethanol

image credit: Roger Meike

Could pond scum solve the world’s energy and global warming crises?

University of Hawai’i professor Pengchen “Patrick” Fu thinks it can, with a little push from biotechnology.

Fu has developed strains of cyanobacteria — one of the components of pond scum — that feed on atmospheric carbon dioxide, and produce ethanol as a waste product.

Pond Scum Can Convert CO2 into Ethanol

image credit: Roger Meike

Could pond scum solve the world’s energy and global warming crises?

University of Hawai’i professor Pengchen “Patrick” Fu thinks it can, with a little push from biotechnology.

Fu has developed strains of cyanobacteria — one of the components of pond scum — that feed on atmospheric carbon dioxide, and produce ethanol as a waste product.